FwF 29 – #Christmas Calamities, Part 1: The Lost Helper

Happy Holidays, Fictioneers!

I start off this episode with a shout-out to some awesome author friends of mine who have been doing dynamite work recently: children’s author (and my illustrator for Hello, Halloween) Donovan Scherer; award-winning horror author Matthew Harrill; and hilarious master parodist Paul Erickson.  Pick up their books for your loved ones this Christmas!

      

Now, on to the meat of the show, where I read you the first story from my book Christmas Calamities.  ‘The Lost Helper’ tells the tale of a poor elf left behind in a family fireplace on Christmas Eve.  Things only get worse when the household children discover him.  Will he be able to get back to Santa in time?

Listen in to find out! 

And while you’re at it, pick up the book!  ‘The Lost Helper’ is only one of several fun holiday yarns therein.  It’s inexpensive, easily transportable, and makes a great stocking stuffer.  Enjoy!

 

FwF 25: Hemingway’s Cheerful Thoughts About Nothing (and FREE BOOKS!)

Welcome back, Fictioneer!

Today I read and discuss one of my favorite short stories: Ernest Hemingway‘s “A Clean, Well-Lighted Place“.  This tale poses the Existentialist question: What is Nothing, and what can we do about it?

                  

 Enjoy my lecturings!  I gave this talk to a group of 9th graders a few weeks ago, and they got a kick out of it (though I think I kind of terrified them).  Now it’s your turn to listen in, read along, and enjoy the fun.

And an announcement:

This weekend – Friday, February 27th through Sunday, March 1st – the books below are available for FREE on Amazon.  Pick them up!

     

 And for the next five days (through March 4th), the books below are ONLY $0.99!!  Grab them as well.

     

Enjoy the reads, and thanks for listening!

If you do like my books, please review them on Amazon!  And if you like the podcast, please rate and review it on iTunes, comment below with what you’d like to hear me talk about, email me at luke@funwithfiction.com, and most importantly, subscribe to the Fun with Fiction newsletter!  I’ll send you all kinds of free stuff and good news (but no more than once a week), 100% spam-free.

Once again, don’t forget to:

‘Like’ Fun with Fiction on Facebook.

Follow me on Twitter.

Pick up your free and discounted books, and…

Sign up for the newsletter!

Thanks again, Fictioneer.  Keep reading, keep believing, keep on rockin’.

Luke

FwF 19 – Fighting and Fantasy: An Interview with Orlando Sanchez (part 2)

 

Hola, Fictioneers!  Here is part deux of my fantastic interview with fantasy author and all-around badass Orlando Sanchez.

In case you missed it last time, these are Orlando’s books:

       

And his magnum opus, The Spiritual Warriors (Book 1 of The Warriors of the Way), is being re-edited and re-released in January, with the next two books in the series to follow shortly thereafter.  Can’t wait for that!

As you can probably tell, Orlando likes to incorporate martial arts philosophy into his fiction (whereas I tend to keep them separate).  We discuss how he accomplishes this, making his books read like mystical kung fu films for the modern age.  (Think Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon meets The Matrix.)

We also praise some of our favorite fiction and talk about how it inspires us.  Names like Douglas Adams, Jim Butcher, and Bob Kane get dropped shamelessly.

             

Returning to the writer’s perspective, we talk about how horrible it is to get a great story idea while you’re in the middle of writing another story (I’m sure our fellow writers can relate).  What can you do?  Keep on pushing through, no matter how much your ADHD and self-doubt scream at you to change course.  Remember, though it is art, you must treat it like a job.  And sometimes, jobs just suck.

And the rough draft (a la NaNoWriMo) is just the beginning.

Then comes the editing, and the wretched pain of murdering your darlings (meaning your words, not your children).  As Bruce Lee put it: hack away the inessentials, and let the beautiful tree within flourish.  And in a rough draft, there are a lot of inessentials.  Only once a book has been thoroughly edited and revised is it ready to show to the world.

But you also can’t show it to the world without a great cover.  Sure people say you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover… but everyone still does it.  Since the great book cover designer and book publishing/marketing master Derek Murphy introduced us, it’s only fair to give him a shout-out here, as well.  (Derek designed the new cover for The Spiritual Warriors.  Take a look at it in this post’s featured image!)

Yes, all of this is a lot of work.  But hey – no one said writing was easy.  (Well, actually, a lot of people say that – but they’re not writers.)

As stated in the last episode, don’t forget to…

Read Orlando’s blog.

Follow him on Twitter.

Like him on Facebook.

Fan him on Goodreads.

Connect with him on LinkedIn.

Do it.  Do it now.  …  What are you waiting for?  🙂

 Thanks again for listening!  Please email me at luke@funwithfiction.com if you’d like to be on the Fun with Fiction podcast.  If you’re an author, an avid reader, or just someone with an interesting take on storytelling, I’d love to talk to you.

Peace out and read on,

– Luke

[P.S. – I know I say this EVERY time, but I’m going to keep doing it ’til everyone signs up:  If you want some great FREE books, other give-aways, and to hear all the latest stuff going on in the Fun with Fiction world, CLICK HERE.  Thanks!]

FwF 16 – Interview with Matthew Harrill: What if Hell Froze Over?

 

I have a special treat for you Fictioneers!  In this episode I interview Matthew W. Harrill – award-winning author of The ARC Chronicles trilogy: Hellbounce, Hellborne, and the upcoming Hellbeast.

        

In this brilliant horror series (I’ve just started the first book, but I already know it’s brilliant), Matt answers the question we’ve all been pondering:

What if Hell really did freeze over?

The ARC Chronicles is a modern dark fantasy of angels and demons and everyday people, all caught up in a terrible conundrum. It was inspired by a two-hour brainstorming session between Matt and his mentor, David Farland (competition judge for L. Ron Hubbard‘s Writers of the Future contest, teacher of Brandon Sanderson and Stephenie Meyer, and author of the Runelords series).

That mentorship obviously did well for Mr. Harrill, as Hellbounce went on to beat several hundred entries to win runner-up in Horror at this year’s Halloween Book Festival.

Hellbounce award

Matt cites influences as diverse as Robert Jordan (The Wheel of Time) and H.P. Lovecraft (Call of Cthulhu and… c’mon, we all know who he is).  He’s learned a great deal about writing from his friend Juliet E. McKenna (Tales of Einarinn, The Hadrumal Crisis, etc.) and from Hank Moody (David Duchovny’s character in the TV show Californication).

This interview covers a ton of great stuff for fans of horror and fantasy fiction, as well as touching on tips for aspiring authors.  Give it a listen!

Once you do that, don’t forget to:

Lastly: if you love fiction like Matt and I do, sign up for the Fun with Fiction newsletter.  Get two FREE books of some of my all-time favorite short stories, exclusive offers, and be the first to hear about upcoming FwF events and releases.

Thanks as always for listening, Fictioneer!  Enjoy the horror.

– Luke

FwF ep 13 – Gods & Monsters with Mo Simpson

Welcome back, Fictioneers!

In this episode of the Fun with Fiction podcast, Cthulhu 4 Kids illustrator and Eyeteeth Podcast host Mo Simpson returns to give us his thoughts on some of the best fiction for Halloween.

Yes, a lot of it appears on Fox News.

But beyond that, Mo has radical recommendations for October entertainment.  (Click on any of the links or pictures in this post to find out more about the item and pick it up from Amazon.)

Mo’s top picks for scary stories include Chuck Palahniuk, Neil Gaiman, and The Walking Dead.

Of course no discussion of Halloween would be complete without recommendations for great horror movies.  Mo and I both highly recommend Cabin in the WoodsJoss Whedon‘s twisted meta-horror take on the entire ‘cabin in the woods’ horror genre.  Seriously, even if you’re not a horror fan, watch this movie.  It’s so much more than you expect!

Back to books!  Mo delves into the mystical creepiness of Aleister Crowley, occultist and contemporary of the great H.P. Lovecraft.  Seriously – if you think Lovecraft and his creations (like Cthulhu) are weird, you ain’t seen nothing yet.  Crowley is the godfather of magick and the occult movement.  Wonderfully whacked out, and frighteningly fascinating.

Our conversation turns well beyond fiction and delves into the realms of religious tradition, philosophy, and the argument of free will vs. determinism.  We draw the connection between superheroes and gods, gods and monsters.  Examples range from the adolescent wish-fulfillment of Superman to the superhero deconstruction of Watchmen.

Mo and I each have viewing recommendations for this best month of the year.  His main squeeze is the Walking Dead TV show.  One of mine is John Carpenter’s Halloween – the only ‘slasher’ flick I’ve ever found worth watching.

Oh – regarding Mo’s top obscure suggestion of the day – click the pic below to get an illustrated collection of some of Aleister Crowley‘s best works – including the Book of Lies, which Mo most highly recommends – for only $0.99!

For this Halloween season Mo and I also recommend our own book, Cthulhu 4 Kids: Old Ones at the Beach!  (Totally unbiased recommendation, we swear.)  Cthulhu 4 Kids II: A Day in R’lyeh is coming out later this month, so grab the first one today.  We think Lovecraft would approve.

And lastly… this conversation isn’t over!  We continue our discussion into the Eyeteeth Podcast.  Mo and I start that episode with a discussion of troubles going on in the world today, but quickly transition into the much more fun topic of superhero movies.  If you like Fun with Fiction, you’ll love this!  Give it a listen below, and subscribe to the Eyeteeth Podcast on iTunes.  (And while you’re there, don’t forget to rate and review Fun with Fiction.  This helps me keep this podcast alive.  Thanks!)

Thanks for listening, Fictioneer!  Keep on reading, keep believing.

‘Til next time,

Luke J. Morris

P.S.  If you want to meet me, and get gorgeous prints and signed paperbacks of mine and Mo’s books Cthulhu 4 Kids and Tales from the Teeth, come out to Ultimate Con tomorrow!  The comic-con takes place at 3601 N. Milwaukee Ave, Chicago, IL, on Saturday, October 11, 2014 from 10 AM to 5 PM.  I’ll be at the Parable Comics booth with some fantastic artists.  Hope to see you there!

FwF Podcast 9 with Mo Simpson: The World is the Best Fiction (part 2)

Welcome back, Fictioneers!

Part 2 of my conversation with Mo Simpson starts off on a brilliantly blasphemous note, introducing a neo-pagan interpretation of Biblical scripture and an insane but believable etymology of the word “Hollywood”.  Did you know Hollywood, the right arm of the government, was founded by Druids?

You do now.  Consider yourself edumacated.

Speaking of Hollywood, we can’t resist discussing the tenuous relationship between comic books and the movies.  Just how unfaithful is Hollywood’s recreation of Watchmen?  Is Alan Moore right to condemn the medium of film for corrupting the art of the comic?

From there we transition to a discussion of the various film incarnations of a certain nocturnal superhero (I’ll give you three guesses).  Who was the best Batman?  The best Joker?  The best supervillain in general?  And the controversial topic of the day – Ben Affleck as the Dark Knight:  horrible mistake, or spitting in the face of God?

While we’re on the subject of gods, does anyone else think that superheroes are our modern versions of the ancient Greek deities?  (I mean, heck, some of them are ancient Greek deities!)  I do, and I make my case fantastically, if I do say so myself.

This leads to a discussion of mythology and the necessity of myth in providing meaning to culture.  No one recognized this better than J.R.R. Tolkien, who created his Middle Earth to provide a new mythopic structure that Britain was sorely lacking.  Granted, he did this in a very Catholic way (see my friend Brad Birzer‘s book J. R. R. Tolkien’s Sanctifying Myth: Understanding Middle-earth for a better understanding of that), but it’s hard to deny the brilliance of his symbolism, no matter what your beliefs are.

We talk about varieties of myth throughout the ages, the benefits of reading The Bible and other spiritual texts as literature (whether or not you believe they are literally true), and what makes myth still essential to the modern man.  Calling something a myth, in the traditional sense, is not saying that it is untrue.  Myth was rather a way of stating the truth – that is, telling the truth through a story that people could relate to and understand.

People need myths.  This is why Nietzsche, anti-Christian that he was, lamented the “death” of God.  While Newton’s mechanistic view of the universe might have had the positive result of turning many people away from irrational superstitions, it left a void; it left people with nothing to believe in.  Those of us who no longer hold to religion – or no longer hold it as a dominant force in our lives, whether or not we nominally believe in it – must find a new locus of meaning.

Throughout this discussion, Mo peppers us with historical etymologies of numerous terms, including “Lord of the Rings” (Saturn?), “Luke Skywalker” (Horus, Loki, or Lucifer?), and “The Holy Trinity” (um… you just gotta listen to this one).  I point out the difference between symbolism and allegory, and Mo adds that his favorite fiction is the real world that we face every day.

That last happens to be my least favorite fiction, as media-fed B.S. is more depressing than enlightening.  This is why I read (well, one reason of many).

What do you think?  Does myth have a function in the modern world?  If so, what kind of mythology do you turn to – religion, superheroes, esoteric theories, or some other collection of weird and wonderful concepts?

For more such enlightening and lively conversations, catch Mo on the Eyeteeth podcast.  And don’t forget to check out our books Cthulhu 4 Kids and Tales from the Teeth.

[Yes, Cthulhu 4 Kids II is still in progress.  It’s coming, we swear!  Please be patient.  In the meantime, give us reviews for the current books on Amazon, and for our podcasts (Fun with Fiction and Eyeteeth) on iTunes!  We’ll love you forever.]

Speaking of books, I have a new one out!  It’s Captain Napalm vs. the Grungious Gundabad, based on disturbingly hilarious superhero stories I’ve been telling my son at bedtime.  The Kindle version is available on Amazon for only $0.99, so if you want to support the Fun with Fiction podcast, pick it up today!

Or here’s an even better option: if you’re into superheroes and sophomoric humor, you’re interested in reading Captain Napalm, and you’re willing to write it an honest review on Amazon within the next month (it’s not a long book), send me an email at luke@funwithfiction.com, and I’ll send you a free review copy!  (In the interest of sanity I have to limit this offer to the first 25 people who email me, though – so shoot me a message today.)

Thank you all, Fictioneers!  I hope you’re enjoying my ramblings.  If you have anything to say – what you like, what you hate, what you want more of – let me know.  Comment below, review me on iTunes, or just shoot me an email.  I’d love to hear from you.

Until next time – happy reading, my friends.

FwF Podcast 8 with Mo Simpson: The World is the Best Fiction (part 1)

Guess what, Fictioneers???

That’s right – Mo Simpson is back on the Fun with Fiction podcast, talking to Luke J. Morris (yours truly) about the struggles of artists, the connection between religious texts and ancient mythologies, the shortcomings of the classical “hero’s quest” version of story, the tenuous relationship between books and the movies (or TV shows) they spawn, and the great weirdness that is Chuck Palahniuk.

This is a two-parter, folks, so don’t forget to tune in next time, when things get even crazier!